Aussies rally around elderly woman after ‘amazing’ snake act

An 80-year-old woman has been deemed a “legend” after rescuing her pup from a huge carpet snake in NSW’s Lennox Heads.

Following the “screams” of her dog she went outside to find a carpet snake coiled around her new pup who had been bitten at least once.

The “gutsy” lady was then bitten three times as she removed the snake from her dog, and yet she still released the snake ethically into the nearby bush.

“Mum then went next door and caught the snake so it could be taken out bush and hopefully not make its way back to her place,” the woman’s daughter posted to the Australian Country Memes Facebook page.

“Very lucky snake, most country people would have settled this one with a shovel,” read one comment.

The post said the lady sought veterinary care for her dog and her daughter confirmed in the comments the dog was uninjured but scared.

The lady was praised for saving both the dog and the snake.

“Good on her for giving the snake freedom too,” one commenter wrote.

A Snake Catcher from Brisbane commented with one simple offer for the 80-year-old: “Does she want a job??”

What do I do if someone gets bitten by a snake?

• Keep the person at rest, reassured and under observation.

• Dial 000.

• Do not wash venom off the skin or clothes.

• Begin CPR, if necessary. 30 chest compressions per 2 breaths.

• If bitten on a limb, apply a firm bandage on the bite site. Ensure the limb is immobilised and the person remains still.

• Work the bandage from the limb foot or hand upwards, working towards the heart and covering as much of the limb as possible. If you can, apply a splint to keep the limb immobile.

• Keep the person still and reassured until medical attention arrives.

What do I do if my pet gets bitten by a snake?

When a pet is bitten it is not always possible to know the type of snake involved so it is important to seek emergency veterinary care as soon as possible.

If your pet shows the following symptoms and/or you think they have been bitten by a snake, RSPCA recommends you keep your pet calm and quiet and take them to the vet immediately. Call the vet ahead of time for advice and so the vet can prepare.

• Sudden weakness followed by collapse, this may be followed by apparent recovery

• Shaking or twitching of the muscles and reduced blinking of the eyes

• Vomiting

• Loss of bladder and bowel control

• Dilated pupils

• Paralysis

• Difficulty breathing and/or fast breathing

• Bleeding from the animal’s nose, mouth and/or site of the snake bite

• Not eating (especially in cats)

• Dark coloured urine (often bloody).

Originally published as ‘Legend’: Aussies rally around elderly woman after ‘amazing’ snake act